Scanlyze

The Online Journal of Insight, Satire, Desire, Wit and Observation

The United States fetishizes gun Violence

The United States fetishizes gun Violence

I think it is very facile to attack guns for gun violence. That model fails to account for societies like Switzerland or Finland with high gun ownership but little gun violence.

What separates the United States is the degree to which it fetishizes gun violence. The stock character of the Western hero has morphed into the hard nosed cop and now into the faceless futuristic enforcer but the plot is the same: a lone man, using violence to right wrongs in society, then conveniently riding off into the sunset. “Hiyo, Silver, away!”

American Exceptionalism is the modern version of Manifest Destiny and White Man’s Burden. All are pinioned on the Idea that American Ideas are the Best, so much Better, in fact, that extreme violence and skullduggery are justified in their lofty pursuit of a greater good only America the Beautiful can provide.

Well, where’s the beef? Where are the benefits this benevolent violence are supposed to provide? Stable governments, democracy, prosperity, pluralism, tolerance, human rights, rule of law, all that?

Shall we ask Afghanistan? Or Libya? Or Yemen? Or Somalia? Or Iraq?

How’s that workin’ for ya USA? Is that the right model for Syria? Really?

I think it is very facile to attack guns for gun violence. That model fails to account for societies like Switzerland or Finland with high gun ownership but little gun violence.

What separates the United States is the degree to which it fetishizes gun violence. The stock character of the Western hero has morphed into the hard nosed cop and now into the faceless futuristic enforcer but the plot is the same: a lone man, using violence to right wrongs in society, then conveniently riding off into the sunset. “Hiyo, Silver, away!”

American Exceptionalism is the modern version of Manifest Destiny and White Man’s Burden. All are pinioned on the Idea that American Ideas are the Best, so much Better, in fact, that extreme violence and skullduggery are justified in their lofty pursuit of a greater good only America the Beautiful can provide.

Well, where’s the beef? Where are the benefits this benevolent violence are supposed to provide? Stable governments, democracy, prosperity, pluralism, tolerance, human rights, rule of law, all that?

Shall we ask Afghanistan? Or Libya? Or Yemen? Or Somalia? Or Iraq?

How’s that workin’ for ya USA? Is that the right model for Syria? Really?

Copyright © 2015 Henry Edward Hardy

30 October, 2015 Posted by | Afghanistan, anthropology, foreign policy, gun, Iraq, Libya, media, nonviolence, policy, scanlyze, Somalia, Syria, United States, violence, Where's the beef? | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I Dreamed I saw Joe Hill Last Night

Joe Hill’s Last Will

My will is easy to decide,
For there is nothing to divide,
My kin don’t need to fuss and moan-
“Moss does not cling to a rolling stone.”
My body? Ah, If I could choose,
I would to ashes it reduce,
And let the merry breezes blow
My dust to where some flowers grow.
Perhaps some fading flower then
Would come to life and bloom again.
This is my last and final will,
Good luck to all of you, Joe Hill

Joe Hill was an IWW man. The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) was, and is a radical union dedicated to abolishing the wage system and replacing it with a democratic system of workplace organization.

Joe Hill was a migrant laborer to the US from Sweden, a poet, musician and union radical. The term “pie in the sky” is believed to come from his satirical song, “The Preacher and the Slave”.

Hill was framed for murder and executed by firing squad in Salt Lake City, Utah on November 19, 1915. His last words were, “Fire!”

Just before his death he wrote to fellow IWW organizer Big Bill Haywood a letter which included the famous words, “Don’t mourn, Organize”.

The poem above was his will. It was set to music and became the basis of a song by Ethel Raim called “Joe Hill’s Last Will”.

A praise poem by Alfred Hayes became the lyrics of the best-known song about Joe Hill, written in 1936 by Earl Robinson. This was sung so beautifully by Joan Baez at Woodstock in 1969:

Joe Hill

words by Alfred Hayes
music by Earl Robinson

I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night,
Alive as you and me.
Says I “But Joe, you’re ten years dead”
“I never died” said he,
“I never died” said he.

“In Salt Lake, Joe,” says I to him,
him standing by my bed,
“They framed you on a murder charge,”
Says Joe, “But I ain’t dead,”
Says Joe, “But I ain’t dead.”

“The Copper Bosses killed you Joe,
they shot you Joe” says I.
“Takes more than guns to kill a man”
Says Joe “I didn’t die”
Says Joe “I didn’t die”

And standing there as big as life
and smiling with his eyes.
Says Joe “What they can never kill
went on to organize,
went on to organize”

From San Diego up to Maine,
in every mine and mill,
where working-men defend their rights,
it’s there you find Joe Hill,
it’s there you find Joe Hill!

I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night,
alive as you and me.
Says I “But Joe, you’re ten years dead”
“I never died” said he,
“I never died” said he.

Written in reply to America, Tiger Lilies & and Politics: A Response to “America the Beautiful and Rabih Haddad”

see also: America the Beautiful and Rabih Haddad

Joe Hill (wikipedia)
Joe Hill mp3’s at emusic.

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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4 February, 2007 Posted by | anarchism, audio, Big Bill Haywood, courage, history, IWW, Joan Baez, Joe Hill, labor, media, mp3, music, nonviolence, peace, poetry, politics, protest, radical, repression, revolution, scanlyze, socialism, strikes, Sverige, Sweden, unions | 4 Comments

Literary Bohemian on Fear and War

Literary Bohemian has a really nice essay about the war(s). This brought a lump to my throat, probably because I miss my own brother so much. The Kevin Tillman letter about his brother Pat gets me for the same reason I suppose. God bless you and watch over you and your brother both, and us all.

I’ve been thinking a lot about war lately –perhaps because the President’s State of the Union address happened recently or because there is talk all over the internet and the news about going to war with Iran. Mostly though, I’ve been thinking about war because my little brother is on a ship at this very moment, destined for the Middle East.

More at: Fear and War

See also: After Pat’s Birthday

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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2 February, 2007 Posted by | brother, Bush, essay, family, military, nonviolence, peace, politics, scanlyze, war | 3 Comments

March on Washington to Oppose War January 27, 2007

March on Washington to Oppose War January 27, 2007

Join together to march for peace and justice in Washington, DC on January 27, 2007! Many lobbying and additional legal, nonviolent protest activities are planned in conjunction. Please go if you can or join in local activities wherever you may be.

United for Peace and Justice
Digg the January 27 March
DC Indymedia
Pacifica Radio WPFW 89.3 FM
BBC video

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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26 January, 2007 Posted by | Afghanistan, Bush, capitalism, DC, demonstration, Iraq, law, media, news, nonviolence, peace, politics, protest, repression, scanlyze, torture, war, Washington | Leave a comment