Scanlyze

The Online Journal of Insight, Satire, Desire, Wit and Observation

The Western Counter-terrorist strategy is a failure

The counterforce, counterintelligence military strategy of the Western Powers in the Middle East is a complete failure.

Maybe we should stop bombing people in their own countries for no reason other than profit.

What if ISIS was dropping flying robot bombs and killing people near your home every week.

Would that make you want to surrender to them and let them install a new puppet government? That is the model the western powers are following.

It only serves the interests of the super rich industrialists who profit from eternal war, and the giant bloated militarys designed to fight the Soviet Union which had ten thousand nuclear weapons, 50 thousand tanks, and six million men under arms.

The media has managed, through selective reporting and selective outrage like that over the atrocities on Belgium this week, to get people so scared that they treat IS, which is 2-3 divisions worth of light infantry and press-ganged, barely trained conscripts, as though it is an existential threat on the scale of the old Soviet Union.

Copyright © 2016 Henry Edward Hardy

23 March, 2016 Posted by | couter-terrorism, drones, Middle East, scanlyze | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights Watch: Ghost Prisoner: Two Years in Secret CIA Detention

Human Rights Watch has compiled a comprehensive report about the case of one of the “disappeared”, Marwan Jabour. Most of the docile and pathetic British and US press have ‘reported’ on this publication without managing to link to it or even so much as mention the name of the report!

Here’s a bit from the Summary:

When Marwan Jabour opened his eyes, after a blindfold, a mask, and other coverings were taken off him, he saw soldiers and, on the wall behind them, framed photographs of King Hussein and King Abdullah of Jordan. He was tired and disoriented from his four-hour plane flight and subsequent car trip, but when a guard confirmed that he was being held in Jordan, he felt indescribable relief. In his more than two years of secret detention, nearly all of it in US custody, this was the first time that someone had told him where he was. The date was July 31, 2006.

A few weeks later, in another first, the Jordanians allowed several of Jabour’s family members to visit him. “My father cried the whole time,” Jabour later remembered.

Marwan Jabour was arrested by Pakistani authorities in Lahore, Pakistan, on May 9, 2004. He was detained there briefly, then moved to the capital, Islamabad, where he was held for more than a month in a secret detention facility operated by both Pakistanis and Americans, and finally flown to a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) prison in what he believes was Afghanistan. During his ordeal, he later told Human Rights Watch, he was tortured, beaten, forced to stay awake for days, and kept naked and chained to a wall for more than a month. Like an unknown number of Arab men arrested in Pakistan since 2001, he was “disappeared” into US custody: held in unacknowledged detention outside of the protection of the law, without court supervision, and without any contact with his family, legal counsel, or the International Committee of the Red Cross.

The secret prison program under which Jabour was held was established in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, when US President George W. Bush signed a classified directive authorizing the CIA to hold and interrogate suspected terrorists. Because the entire program was run outside of US territory, it required the support and assistance of other governments, both in handing over detainees and in allowing the prisons to operate.

–from the Summary of Ghost Prisoner: Two Years in Secret CIA Detention

See also: BBC Report: ‘Sleaze alleged in CIA’
European Union: Report on the alleged use of European countries by the CIA for the transportation and illegal detention of prisoners

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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1 March, 2007 Posted by | Afghanistan, archives, Central Intelligence Agency, CIA, covert operations, crime, detention, human rights, Human Rights Watch, international law, investigations, Jordan, kidnapping, law, law of nations, Marwan Jabour, memory hole, Middle East, military, news, Pakistan, peace, politics, prisoner, prisoners, rendition, report, repression, torture, war, war crimes | Leave a comment

European Union: Report on the alleged use of European countries by the CIA for the transportation and illegal detention of prisoners

The European Parliament has voted to endorse and publish a report strongly condemning the use of European facilities for the alleged kidnapping, torture, and illegal imprisonment allegedly carried out and facilitiated in EU states by alleged US persons. The resolution was passed on or about Feb 14, 2007 by a majority of 382 to 256 with 74 abstentions.

This news was ‘covered’ by the BBC, Financial Times, Radio Free Europe, Islamic Republic News Agency, Irish Times and others. However most (or all, seemingly) news accounts did not include the name of the report or a link to it. And it seems not to be easily searchable from the various EU institution sites or general search sites. Some legislative history and parliamentary questions were accessible by searching at europa.eu on on ‘rendition’.

Following are the header and conclusions from the full report.


EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

2004 – 2009

Session document

FINAL

A6-9999/2007

26.1.2007

 

REPORT

on the alleged use of European countries by the CIA for the transportation and illegal detention of prisoners

 

(2006/2200(INI))Temporary Committee on the alleged use of European

countries by the CIA for the transportation and illegal detention of prisoners

Rapporteur: Giovanni Claudio Fava

 

[…]

 

Final conclusions

225. Stresses, in view of the powers it was provided with and of the time which it had at its

disposal, and the secret nature of the investigated actions, that the Temporary

Committee was not put in a position fully to investigate all the cases of abuses and

violations falling within its remit and that its conclusions are therefore not exhaustive;

226. Recalls the principles and values on which the European Union is based, as provided in

Article 6 of the Treaty on European Union, and calls on the EU institutions to meet their

responsibilities in relation to Article 7 of the Treaty on European Union and all other

relevant provisions of the Treaties, and to take all appropriate measures in the light of

the conclusions of the work of the Temporary Committee, the facts revealed in the

course of the Temporary Committee’s investigation and any other facts that may emerge

in the future; expects the Council to start hearings and commission an independent

investigation without delay, as foreseen in Article 7, and, where necessary, to impose

sanctions on Member States in case of a serious and persistent breaches of Article 6,

including where a violation of human rights has been declared by an international body

but no measure has been taken to redress the violation;

227. Believes that the principle of loyal cooperation enshrined in the Treaties -which requires

Member States and the EU institutions to take measures to ensure the fulfilment of their

obligations under the Treaties, such as the respect of human rights, or resulting from

action taken by the EU institutions, such as ascertaining the truth about alleged CIA

flights and prisons, and to facilitate the achievement of EU tasks and objectives – has

not been respected;

228. Recalls that in light of European Court of Human Rights case law, a signatory State

bears responsibility for the material breach of the provisions of the ECHR, and therefore

also of Article 6 of the Treaty on the European Union, not only if its direct

responsibility can be established beyond reasonable doubt, but also by failing to comply

with its positive obligation to conduct an independent and impartial investigation into

reasonable allegations of such violations;

229. Notes the reports by reputable media operators that extraordinary rendition, illegal

detention, and systematic torture involving many people is continuing, and considering

the declaration by the current US Government that the use of extraordinary rendition

and secret places of detention will be continued; therefore calls for an EU-US counterterrorism

summit to seek an end to such inhumane and illegal practices, and to insist

that cooperation with regard to counter-terrorism is consistent with international human

rights and anti-torture treaty obligations;

230. Instructs its Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, where necessary in

cooperation with the Committee on Foreign Affairs, notably its Sub-Committee on

Human Rights, to follow up politically the proceedings of the Temporary Committee

and to monitor the developments, and in particular, in the event that no appropriate

action has been taken by the Council and/or the Commission, to determine whether

there is a clear risk of a serious breach of the principles and values on which the

European Union is based, and to recommend to it any resolution, taking as a basis

Articles 6 and 7 of the Treaty on European Union, which may prove necessary in this

context;

231. Calls on its Secretary-General to publish, at least in compliance with Regulation

1049/2001, all the documents received, produced and examined, as well as the records

of the proceedings of the Temporary Committee on the Internet as well as in any other

appropriate manner and calls on the Secretary-General to ensure that the developments

in fields falling within the remit of the Temporary Committee after its disbandment are

monitored;

232. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the

governments and parliaments of the Member States, of the candidate Member States

and the associated countries, and to the Council of Europe, NATO, the United Nations

and the Government and two Houses of Congress of the United States, and to request

them to keep Parliament informed of any development that may take place in the fields

falling in the remit of the Temporary Committee.

see also: Temporary Committee on the alleged use of European countries by the CIA for the transport and illegal detention of prisoners

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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14 February, 2007 Posted by | Afghanistan, America, BBC, Bush, Central Intelligence Agency, CIA, covert operations, customary law, detention, Europa, Europe, European Union, Financial Times, Giovanni Claudio Fava, human rights, intelligence, Iran, Iraq, Irish Times, Islamic Republic News Agency, kidnapping, law, law of nations, media, memory hole, Middle East, military, murder, national security, news, newspapers, peace, politics, prisoners, radio, Radio Free Europe, rendition, repression, Taliban, torture, USA, war, war crimes | 1 Comment

Najaf Update: February 9, 2007

According to the Egyptian weekly Al-Ahram, there is a claim by an Iraqi parliamentarian that as many as 1,500 people may have been killed in last week’s fighting near An-Najaf. The nature of the groups engaged there and their leadership remains a matter of uncertainty.

Tales of the hidden imam

by Nermeen Al-Mufti
Al-Ahram

According to independent parliamentarian Mohammad Al-Deini, Iranian agents are trying to distract attention from killings in Najaf. According to Al-Deini, the Iraqi army, backed by US forces, shelled an Arab tribal convoy as it was proceeding to Najaf to participate in Imam Al-Husein celebrations. Most of the victims were from Al-Hawatemah tribe, a Shia clan known to oppose Iranian intervention in Iraq. Al-Deini believes that the hidden imam story was a cover-up for a far more gruesome affair. Up to 1,500 people may have been killed in Najaf, he added.

News agencies have conducted interviews with eyewitnesses from Al-Hawatemah tribe. The eyewitnesses confirmed that their clan is Shia-Arab. Clashes, eyewitnesses said, began when the car transporting the clan’s chief and his wife approached a checkpoint ahead of Najaf on the festival of Ashura. The chief was about to explain to the soldiers manning the checkpoints that the authorities had approved their trip, but before he had the chance to make his point shots were fired. The chief, identified as Sheikh Saad Al-Nayif, his wife and his driver were killed. The rest of the clan, who were armed with machineguns for protection, had no option but to return the fire, the eyewitnesses said.

A source from Jund Al-Samaa said that the group was a peaceful one and took no part in the fighting. But an official source claimed that Jund Al-Samaa was an “ungodly” group and with a leader who managed to convince poor and uneducated young men that he was the hidden imam. The leader had given the young men his book, Qadi Al-Samaa (The Judge of Heavens), in which he claims that one of the signs of the appearance of the hidden imam was the killing of top religious scholars. Reporters in south Iraq cited members of impoverished families as confirming that their sons were members of Jund Al-Samaa and had gone to Zarka before the clashes broke out.

Jund Al-Samaa (wikipedia)

See also: Keyword ‘Najaf’ on scanlyze

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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9 February, 2007 Posted by | Air Force, Army, Bush, covert operations, Iraq, massacre, media, memory hole, Middle East, military, Najaf, news, peace, politics, USA, war, war crimes, weird | Leave a comment

‘Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid’: Jimmy Carter’s Middle East Peace Plan

Jimmy Carter’s Middle East Peace Plan

Palestine: Peace not Apartheid
Jimmy Carter
Simon and Schuster, 2006

by Henry Edward Hardy


Palestine: Peace not Apartheid, former US President Jimmy Carter’s newest book, is a fair-minded and well-reasoned account and analysis of the past 50 years of Palestinian and Israeli relations. The inflammatory title is unfortunate: not because one could not make a case that there are similarities between the Israeli occupation of Palestine and the former white minority regime in South Africa. Simply though, it’s a case he doesn’t make. The book isn’t about apartheid, and it isn’t really mostly about Palestine per se. Rather, it is a diplomatic perspective of the history leading to the current bloody stalemate, and how in Carter’s view it might be alleviated.In many ways, Carter is an ideal interlocutor to describe and analyze the events, policies and personalities which have shaped the bloody history of Palestine and Israel. His recounting of past events and meetings, based on copious note taken by Carter and his wife Rosalynn, have the ring of truth and authenticity to them that writers like Bob Woodward must rightfully envy.

Carter cannot be justly accused of having an overly sympathetic view toward the PLO, Hamas or their elites. Similarly he clearly understands the different natures of the Arab and Israeli regimes. He says, “Only among Israelis, in a democracy with almost unrestricted freedom of speech, can one hear a wide range of opinion concerning the disputes among themselves and with Palestinians.” By contrast, Carter says, “It is almost fruitless to seek free expressions of opinion from private citizens in Arab countries with more authoritarian leadership.”

Carter begins with a succinct timeline of key events in the post-1948 history of what was previously known as Palestine under the British Mandate. His chapter on “The Key Players” has an informative summary of the narrative of key events as constructed by Israeli, Palestinian, US, and Arab officials and personalities.

Carter is not too immodest in describing the Camp David peace process that led to peace between Israel and Egypt and the Nobel Peace Prize for himself in 2004. He does speak disdainfully of the rather amateurish (in his view) efforts of the Clinton and Bush Jr. administrations, while he speaks approvingly of former Reagan Secretary of State James Baker.

It is clear that Carter has continued to play a behind-the-scenes role in the Middle East. He describes how he and the personnel of the Carter Center overcame significant obstacles in monitoring the elections for the Palestinian Parliament and President. And he describes some interesting detail of how he helped to facilitate the back-channel negotiations which led to the “Geneva Initiative”, an unofficial framework for a comprehensive negotiated solution to the illegal Israeli occupation of the land seized in the 1967 “Six Day War”.

Some of Carter’s most withering criticism pertains to what he calls Israel’s “segregation wall” separating parts of the West Bank from other parts. “Israeli leaders,” Carter writes, “are imposing a system of partial withdrawal, encapsulation, and apartheid on the Muslim and Christian citizens of the occupied territories”. Carter notes that this wall was found to be in contravention of International laws and covenants by the International Court of Justice, but that the Israeli Supreme Court and Israeli government have refused to recognize or implement this decision.

Carter understands that the basis for any permanent peace in Palestine must come within the framework of UN Security Council resolution 242, which calls for the return of land seized by Israel during the Six-Day War. Carter notes that Israel itself voted for the resolution.

Carter’s recollection of facts, dates and personalities is such that we can only wish regretfully that the current President, a man 22 years his junior, could be even half as percipient and perspicuous. Palestine: Peace not Apartheid is an admirable primer for the history of the conflict and what has brought it to the current fraught state of affairs. It is a devastating critique of Israeli diplomatic perfidy and double-dealing and of the impossible conditions of privation and despair brought about by the segmentation and fragmentation of the West Bank; the desperate poverty and malnutrition brought on by the Israeli siege, and the counterproductive spiral of suicide bombings and military reprisals it engenders.

Carter borrows from his previous book, The Blood of Abraham (Houghton Mifflin 1985), so not all of the material in this current effort can be considered entirely new. His writing style is pedestrian, although not plodding it by no means sizzles, sparkles, or snaps. He is a bit prim and patrician in his uncharitable evaluation of Clinton’s peace efforts and the current administration’s diplomatic aspirations. And his evangelical background tinges some of his perspectives with an unfortunate, and unnecessarily sectarian cast. Though imperfect, Palestine: Peace not Apartheid is a lucid, thoughtful and important book.

Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid (wikipedia)

A version of this article was previously published in Current Magazine and on Electric Current.

Copyright © 2007 Henry Edward Hardy

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5 February, 2007 Posted by | archives, books, democratic, diplomacy, history, Israel, Jimmy Carter, media, Middle East, nobel prize, nonfiction, Palestine, peace, reviews, scanlyze | Leave a comment